Mark Hillier

Mark Hillier

Associate Professor of Quantitative Methods
Evert McCabe Faculty Fellow


  • PhD, Stanford University, 1994
  • MS, Stanford University, 1991
  • BS, Swarthmore College, 1989


Specialties
  • Quantitative methods
  • Operations management
  • Inventory control


Positions Held
  • At the University of Washington since 1993


Current Research
  • Modeling of issues related to component commonality, delayed product differentiation, and centralization
  • Optimizing warehouse policies for stowing and picking
  • Improving the efficiency of unpaced production lines through workload balancing (or unbalancing) and buffer space allocation


Honors and Awards
  • Evert McCabe Endowed Fellowship:
    • 2013-2016
    • 2010-2013
    • 2007-2010
    • 2004-2007
  • Paccar Award for Teaching Excellence (2007, 2013)
  • Eight-time winner of Daytime MBA Core Professor of the Quarter:
    • Spring 2013
    • Spring 2012
    • Spring 2011
    • Spring 2010
    • Spring 2009
    • Spring 2007
    • Spring 2006
    • Spring 2005
  • MBA Elective Professor of the Year (2006-2007)
  • Two-time winner of MBA Elective Professor of the Quarter (Winter 2001 and Winter 2007)
  • Evening MBA Core Professor of the Quarter (Winter 2005)  
  • Dean’s Citizenship Award for “Exemplary Citizenship in the UW Business School” (2004)
  • Neal and Jan Dempsey Endowed Faculty Fellowship (2002-2003 and 2003-2004)
  • Best Paper Award for 2000-2001, IIE Transactions (Scheduling and Logistics)


      Professional Affiliations
      • Member of INFORMS since March 1992
      • Member of IIE since January 2002


      Selected Publications
      • Hillier, M.S. (2013), "Designing Unpaced Production Lines to Optimize Throughput and Work-in-Process Inventory," IIE Transaction, (45), 516-527.
      • Hillier, F.S. and M.S. Hillier, (2013). "Introduction to Management Science: A Modeling and Case Studies Approach with Spreadsheets,"  Fifth Edition, McGraw-Hill/Irwin.
      • Hillier, F.S. and M. S. Hillier (2007), "Trends in OR/MS Education at the Introductory Level," chapter in Book Tutorials in Operations Research, published in conjunction with the 2007 INFORMS meeting in Seattle.
      • Simultaneous Allocation of Workload and Buffer Space in Unpaced Production Lines with Random Processing Times,” IIE Transactions, Vol. 38, January 2006, pp. 53-65.
      • Using Commonality as Backup Safety Stock,” European Journal of Operational Research, Vol. 136, February 2002, pp. 353-365.
      • Hillier, M.S. (2000), "Component Commonality in Multiple-Period, Assemble-to-Order Systems", IIE Transactions, (32), 755-766.
        (Winner of Best Paper Award for 2000-2001 in IIE Transactions - Scheduling and Logistics).
      • Hillier, M.S. and M.L. Brandeau (1998). "Optimal Component Assignment and Board Grouping in Printed Circuit Board Manufacturing", Operations Research, (46), 675-689.


      Working Papers
      Hillier, M. and T. Klastorin, "Optimizing Inventory Location and Routing at a Retail Fulfillment Center".

      Courses Taught
      • Business Administration 502 - Decision Support Models
      • Business Administration 505 - Decision Support Models
      • MSIS 502 - Computer-Based Statistical Analysis and Decision Support Modeling
      • Operations Management 301 - Principles of Operations Management
      • Operations Management 402 - Introduction to Logistics
      • Operations Management 535 - Logistics and Physical Distribution Management
      • Quantitative Methods 450 - Spreadsheet Modeling for Managerial Decision Making
      • Quantitative Methods 501 - Decision Support Models
      • Quantitative Methods 551 - Modeling with Spreadsheets
      • TMMBA 514 - Decision Support Models

      Contact Information

      Phone:206-685-1912
      Fax:206-543-3969
      Office:465 Paccar Hall
      Email:mhillier@uw.edu
      Web:

      Mailing Address

      Foster School of Business, Paccar Hall
      University of Washington
      Box 353226
      Seattle, WA 98195-3226

      "Effective inventory management involves resolving the conflicting goals of reducing inventory levels while still maintaining high levels of service. Utilizing component commonality has helped meet these goals."